Halloween is supposed to be spooky but all in good fun. Unfortunately there are some scary statistics for pedestrian accidents on Halloween; it is the deadliest night of the year for pedestrian car accidents! On average, more than twice as many children are killed in pedestrian-car accidents on Halloween between 4 p.m. and 10 p.m. than during the same hours on any other day of the year with almost two-thirds of those accidents occurring between 5 p.m. and 9 pm.

Whether you will be out trick or treating with little ones or driving to a party, there are some things you can do to keep yourself and your kids safe this Halloween.

Halloween Safety Tips from AAA

Avoid neighborhood shortcuts.
Children should be especially careful at crosswalks, intersections and in the middle of the street. Remind them that although the neighborhood has taken on a festive atmosphere, there are still cars on the road. Data from State Farm reports that 70% of pedestrian accidents occur in the middle of residential streets.

Trick-or-Treat together.
Parents should trick or treat with young children. Older children should be in a group of trusted friends.

Choose a neighborhood with sidewalks.
And use them! If that is not possible, walk on the far left side of the street, facing oncoming traffic.

Make yourselves visible.
Put reflective tape on costumes and carry a flashlight. Also, make sure you can see properly: avoid disguises that block vision.

Make a travel plan.
Plan your route ahead of time and remind children to stop at the end of driveways and sidewalk corners to check for cars. Always use cross-walks!

Buckle up.
When you are driving to a neighborhood to trick or treat, be sure that everyone is using their seat belt! Also, have children exit and enter on the passenger side of the vehicle.

Halloween Safety Tips for Drivers

Avoid cutting through residential neighborhoods.
If possible, take arterial routes to get to your destination and once you enter a neighborhood with trick-or-treaters, be very cautious.

Watch for children in the street.
It goes without saying that there will be a lot of children in the street on Halloween. In their excitement, they may forget to look for cars when crossing neighborhood streets, cross-walks, driveways, medians and curbs. Watch for children darting out mid-block or from between parked cars.

Turn on headlights.
At dusk (around 5 p.m.), turn on your head lights to improve road visibility. If it is foggy, turn on your fog lights but not within range of children trick-or-treating.

Slowdown.
According to the NHTSA, a pedestrian is more than twice as likely to die from a car accident in which the vehicle was travelling at a speed of 35 mph instead of 25 mph.

Back up carefully.
Be extra slow and cautious when backing up or parking.

Drive with extra attention to the road.
You can expect the unexpected on Halloween so drive with your eyes wide open and with a full focus on the road. Pay extra attention at crosswalks and corners.

Don’t drink or use drugs and drive.
If you are attending a Halloween party and consuming alcohol, make sure you have a safe way to get home.

If you or a loved one were injured in an accident, you have enough to deal with. Let an experienced accident attorney fight for the full compensation that you deserve. It is not uncommon to receive a settlement from the insurance company that is five to ten times bigger with the help of a lawyer. Call the caring accident attorneys at Tario & Associates, P.S. in Bellingham, WA today for a FREE consultation! We have been representing residents of Whatcom County, Skagit County, Island County and Snohomish County since 1979. You will pay nothing up front and no attorney fees at all unless we recover damages for you!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *